What is Nostalgia Trip?
Nostalgia Trip is an idea to explore the stories from anyone about events that made a difference to their idol fandom. Live events, trips, concerts, meeting your Idol, meeting other fans, your first purchase, if it’s an interesting story we can talk about it!
!Note: Format is still open for modification, we are a work in progress!!

Have an interesting story?
E-mail InvisNantoka at takamaruyo.net
with your story, big or small, and you might see your story on the site!

Comments or suggestions?
Drop it in the comment box below.

Invis sat down with Dran, content provider for Takamaruyo and major member of the Sudou Maasa Fan-group known as the Church of Maasa to talk about some of his firsts in fandom. Here we talk about how he got into Hello!Project Fandom in general.

Invis:
Do you wanna start from the very beginning?
Dran:
Sounds like a reasonable place to start.
Invis:
Sounds good, so let’s start off with when you got into your idol fandom, when did you start?
Dran:
The beginning of 2007.
Background:
Many events occurred Hello!Project Idol wise in 2007. C-ute made its official debut in February after being an indie group for 2 years. 2007 also marks the official acknowledgement of the 10th anniversary of Morning Musume with the formation of the Morning Musume 10th Anniversary Group. Berryz Koubou was given their first Saitama Super Arena concert, setting the record for the youngest group to perform there.
Dran:
I actually discovered them completely by accident. I’m sure some people are familiar with this story already, but I was looking around YouTube for videos by the artist ‘hitomi’, and stumbled across Yossy’s appearance of Matthew’s Best Hit TV. At first, I wasn’t aware that these were two different people, but from there I started listening to Morning Musume.
Invis:
Ah so your first foray into H!P idol culture was with Morning Musume?
Dran:
Yeah. I was originally a Yossy fan. Quite poorly timed though, as she graduated in May of that year.
Invis:
yah I remember that fairly well, but what was it about Yossy on Best Hit TV that got your attention?
Dran:
I’m not really sure. They made a lot of references to Morning Musume and the other members which I would have had no way of understanding.
Invis:
So you were a Yossy of her because she was the first you saw?
Dran:
I would later really become a fan of Yossy for her sense of humour and I guess that cute tomboyish personality which she had in earlier years. But at that time, I think it was just a case of “She was the girl I saw first and introduced me to H!P”. But if I choose a moment, I guess seeing a clip of the PV for Go Girl ~ Koi no Victory playing that really caught my interest and made me look more into the group.
Invis:
So the PV for Go Girl that made the transition to Morning Musume as a whole? Was there something other than the cute girls that got your attention about the PV?
Dran:
The catchy song. Even now when I listen to it, I can’t resist the urge to sing along boisterously.
Invis:
Do you do the dance too, “♪Appare Appare KISS shite GATO♪?
Dran:
Of course!
Invis:
It is a really popular dance for its time. Now you mentioned hitomi, let’s get some background on your mindset at the time, what other J-music were you into, and did it match the style of Music Morning Musume was known for at the time?
Dran:
At the time I was still largely into anime, so there’s the old anime themes. I was starting to get bored of PUFFY, whom I had been a fan of for a couple of years, and who had really introduced me to J-Pop in the first place.
Invis:
Ah PUFFY! Or Puffy AmiYumi as they’re know in some locations, so you’re a part of the fairly common transition between Anime and J-Pop music that happens. A lot of people I know, including myself, had started in a similar way.
Dran:
Yeah. This was also back in the early days of YouTube, around 2006. Anime popularity was booming in the west, and YouTube certainly helped. It was only natural that some people would make the jump from Japanese anime to liking Japanese music.
Invis:
Definitely, and it’s one of the best starting points for how people culturally transitioned into the Japanese music scene.
Dran:
Indeed.
Invis:
So it’s 2007, and you just found Morning Musume, how did you go about diving deeper down the proverbial rabbit hole?
Dran:
I’m sure the same way most other people at that time did so. First, I devoured everything I could get. All of the old Utabans, the MechaIke specials, Hello! Mornings… The list goes on. DJ-Waffles was a name that I somewhat revered at the time.
Invis:
Did anything have a particular impact on your growth?
Dran:
But, perhaps more crucially, I joined a forum. It’s often pretty understated, but being part of a community of other fans whom you can talk to really helps you immerse yourself completely in that fandom. It takes it from being a novelty that you occasionally enjoy to being a hobby that you can enjoy with other people.
Invis:
Were you particularly active member or more or less a netstalker?
Dran:
I was probably one of the most consistently active members of that community for two or three years.
Invis:
Impressive, not everyone would willingly jump into a community right away. I know I didn’t.
Dran:
It was new and incredibly small. The people were friendly and helpful. I had a lot of fun in those days.
Invis:
It’s easy when you’re a tightly knit group, it’s not always that easy. What was the majority of your talk about? Were talks focused on the older things you had seen, or looking forward into new things that were happening?
Dran:
I think there was certainly a lot of both kinds of topics there, but there was also a lot more general chat between the members which didn’t necessarily have anything to do with Hello!Project. If you wanted to talk about what cool Morning Musume goods you had just bought or whether something particularly fun had happened to you that day, it was all fair play.

Continue to page 2!

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